ASM Live at ICAAC 2014

Be part of the studio audience for the American Society for Microbiology 2014 live internet talk show, ASM Live at ICAAC. Host Michael Schmidt, Ph.D., Professor and Vice Chairman of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, will discuss the latest science at the meeting with a variety of guest researchers and will take questions from the audience and the internet.

Tapings will take place in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center and meeting registrants are encouraged to attend. You can watch ASM Live at ICAAC below and topics will be archived immediately on YouTube and MicrobeWorld for future viewing.

Watch Live

(To ask a question please post it in the chat or tweet it using the hash tag #asmlive. ASM Live is now mobile friendly.)

 

Schedule

Please note: The following schedule is preliminary and subject to change. All participants are invited, not confirmed. All times are listed as Eastern Standard Time. All events take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Room 146A. 

Saturday, September 6


9:00 a.m. -- Antibiotic Stewardship: Saving Drugs, Saving Money

Antibiotic stewardship programs, which promote the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals and other healthcare centers, can not only lead to reduction in antibiotic use with no adverse effects but can also lead to significant savings, over $600,000 annually in the case of one New York Hospital. Participants will discuss case studies of two such programs.

Nishant Prasad, New York Hospital, Queens
Fredrik Resman, Lund University

11:00 a.m. -- New Single-Dose Influenza Drug
An analysis of phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials shows that a single injected dose of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) paramivir is safe and effective at alleviating influenza symptoms including fever and viral shedding when administered within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. Researchers will present data on what may be the first new influenza drug in over a decade.

Bill Sheridan, BioCryst
Rich Whitley, University of Alabama at Birmingham 

Sunday, September 7


10:00 a.m. -- Tests for Rapid Detection of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

Rapid detection of antibiotic resistance is vital in assessing the appropriate antibiotic therapy for an infection. Participants will present data on two new inexpensive tests to detect antibiotic resistance markers within hours or even minutes.

Laurent Poirel, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
Karim Morey, Oregon State Public Health Lab

11:00 a.m. -- New Antifungal Option for Cancer Patients
A newly developed antifungal, isavuconazole, is as effective as an existing drug, voriconazole against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects. Researchers will present phase III data on this new drug.

Kieren Marr, Johns Hopkins University
Andrew Ullmann, Julius Maximilians University

12:00 noon -- Each Day in Hospital Increases Resistance Risk
For patients who acquire an infection while in the hospital, each day of hospitalization increases the risk that the infection will be caused by a drug-resistant bacterium. Researchers will present data showing that that risk increases by as much as 1% each day.

John Bosso, Medical University of South Carolina 

Monday, September 8


9:00 a.m. -- How Quickly Viruses Can Contaminate a Building
Using tracer viruses, researchers found that contamination of just a single doorknob or table top results in the spread of viruses throughout office buildings, hotels, and health care facilities. Within 2 to 4 hours, the virus could be detected on 40 to 60 percent of workers and visitors in the facilities and commonly touched objects. Simple use of common disinfectant wipes reduced virus spread by 80 to 99 percent.

Charles Gerba, University of Arizona, Tucson

9:45 a.m. -- New Targets for SARS/MERS Drugs
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in 2012, causing an expanding epidemic of a “SARS-like” illness in the Middle East with exported cases to the United States, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Reports of human-to-human transmission of MERS-CoV in healthcare facilities and close family contacts have raised global concern about its pandemic potential. Unfortunately there are currently no antiviral agents approved for treatment of MERS or SARS. Researchers will discuss late-breaking research on a newly identified candidate compound as well as other options for treatment currently in the pipeline.

Hao Lei, University of Illinois at Chicago
Hyun Lee, University of Illinois at Chicago
Jasper Chan, University of Hong Kong

10:30 a.m. -- New Antimicrobial Strategy Silences NDM-1 Resistance Gene in Pathogens
Researchers have created a synthetic DNA analog that can bind to and silence the gene responsible for NDM-1, a severe form of antibiotic resistance that can make some bacteria resistant to almost all antibiotics.

Bruce Geller, Oregon State University, Corvallis

12 noon -- MEDIA AVAILABILITY: Ebola Experts
Recognizing the importance of the public health emergency of the Ebola outbreak in western Africa, the organizers of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) the annual infectious diseases meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), have added 3 new presenters to the program to speak on the disease. These speakers will participate in a Media Availability facilitated by Dr. Michael Schmidt of the Medical University of South Carolina. The media availability will be both live and online.

Barbara Knust, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Gary Kobinger; National Microbiology Lab., Winnipeg, Canada
Aneesh Mehta, Emory University School of Medicine

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